Melville Family Health Centre
Integrated Family Healthcare

Opening Hours : Monday-Friday     8.00 – Late
Saturday     8.00 – Lunchtime

  Contact : (08) 9330 3922

All Posts in Category: MoveWell

Products

Move Well has researched the market to bring a range of musculoskeletal products, which will help to alleviate your symptoms and optimize your recovery. From braces to hot packs, orthotics to joint supplements, Move Well physiotherapists are equipped with the knowledge to ensure that you choose the right product for your injury.

List of Products
Dietary Supplements:
  • Glucosamine Joint Supplement
  • Omega Oils for increased peripheral circulation and joint nutrition
  • Lifepak Multivitamin Supplement
  • CordyMax Stamina/Vitality Supplement
  • Overdrive’ Sports Supplement

Orthopaedic Braces for all joints including low back and postural braces.

Orthotics to improve/correct the biomechanics of the foot and lower limb, can be used in conjunction with physiotherapy to effectively manage your injury.

Orthopaedic Pillows provide you with the best possible support for your neck to ensure a good night’s sleep.

Hot Packs can be used to effectively reduce muscle spasm and pain with some injuries, ask your physio today.

Strapping Tape for sports injuries.

Anti-inflammatory gels/creams to reduce soft tissue pain and swelling.

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Vertigo (dizziness)

Dizziness is often caused by illnesses that affect the inner ear, including benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), migraine and inflammation of the inner ear balance apparatus (called vestibular neuritis). Dizziness may also be caused by low blood pressure, some heart problems (such as cardiac arrhythmias), anxiety disorders such as panic attacks or (uncommonly) by hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar).

Symptoms of dizziness and vertigo:

  • A sensation of movement (including spinning), either of yourself or the external environment
  • Unsteadiness, including finding it difficult to walk in a straight line
  • Light-headedness
  • Feeling ‘faint’
  • Further symptoms that may accompany dizziness include:
  • Headache
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Ringing or other sounds in the ears (tinnitus)
  • Difficulty hearing
  • Staggering gait and loss of coordination (ataxia)
  • Unusual eye movements, such as flitting of the eyes (nystagmus)
  • Finding it difficult to see clearly when moving, for example, reading a sign while walking or driving

Inside the inner ear is a series of canals filled with fluid. These canals are oriented at different angles, and as the head moves, the movement of the fluid inside these canals tells the brain how far, how fast and in what direction the head is moving. This information is then used by the brain to move the eyes an equal and opposite amount, so that the image that is ‘seen’ by the eyes does not blur and remains clear.

What causes dizziness and vertigo?

Disorders of the inner ear account for about half of all cases of persistent (ongoing) dizziness. Disorders include Meniere’s disease, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and vestibular neuritis.

Your doctor will run some tests if you are suffering from vertigo (medical history, physical examination, blood pressure check, MRI scan in extreme cases), but may send you to a physiotherapist if BPPV is suspected.

If you suffer from BPPV your Move Well Physiotherapist can treat and manage this condition. Treatment will involve Canalith positioning procedures, which are a special set of exercises designed to remove inner ear ‘crystals’ in BPPV. You will also be given advice on self management to prevent recurrence of the condition.

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Women’s Health

Move Well has a number of Physiotherapists experienced in the treatment of health issues specifically related to women. You may see your Move Well Physiotherapist for treatment of incontinence and other pelvic floor issues, pre and post natal exercise prescription, post menopausal health and prevention of osteoporosis, and treatment of acute conditions such as mastitis.

Pelvic floor dysfunction

Real-time ultrasound imaging (RTUI) assists with the assessment of pelvic floor dysfunction and can be performed safely and non-invasively. (See RTUI information). Your breathing pattern will also need to be assessed as good diaphragmatic breathing is essential for ideal pelvic floor function. Using RTUI you will actually be able to see your pelvic floor muscles contracting, and learn how to perform the exercises correctly, for both contraction and relaxation of this muscle group.

Mastitis and/or blocked milk ducts

Therapeutic ultrasound can often unblock a clogged milk duct very quickly. If the ducts are not unblocked in a timely manner, true mastitis can result, with the client suffering a fever, rigors, and sharp pain in the breast. Mastitis can come on very quickly and is very uncomfortable, so it is best to seek medical and physiotherapy attention as soon as possible.

Pre and post natal exercise prescription

Your body goes through so many changes during pregnancy, so it is essential to exercise in a safe but effective manner to remain healthy and happy. As your body changes, weaknesses in your muscles or joints may become apparent that were not obvious before hand. Once your baby has arrived, it is time to ensure your pelvic floor is functioning well, and that your lower back is strong enough to allow you to carry your baby around. Your Move Well Physiotherapist can devise a pre and post natal exercise program that is right for you.

Osteoporosis

As women age they become very susceptible to developing osteoporosis, or loss of calcium in the bones. A regular weight bearing exercise regime can decrease your bone density loss. This might involve a walking program, or even lifting light weights at home. A balance program can also assist in the prevention of falls, a common cause of bone fractures in older women. Your Move Well Physiotherapist can advise you on exercise and lifestyle habits to keep you strong and healthy as you age.

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Real-time Ultrasound Imaging (RTUI)

Real-time ultrasound imaging (RTUI) is well known for looking at babies in utero and injured tendons around the shoulder. Physiotherapists also use RTUI to assess and retrain the deep muscles of the body that cannot be easily palpated during exercise.

Seeing is believing!

Sometimes it is hard to get the right muscle contracting in the right way. Seeing the muscle working on the screen as you contract it and relax it can make learning the correct contraction so much easier. What muscles do we assess and rehabilitate with RTUI? 

Low back and deep abdominal muscles

These muscles are sometimes referred to as the “core” muscles, and are the deepest muscles supporting the low back and abdominal wall. Ideally, all of the following muscle groups should be assessed and rehabilitated to ensure ideal low back function:

  • The diaphragm
  • Transversus abdominis
  • Lumbar multifidus
  • Pelvic floor
Pelvis and hip

Low back, hip and pelvic injuries are increasing exponentially in the sporting population. Sports are getting faster and tougher and sometimes our bodies bear the brunt of this. Ensuring the deep muscles that support the hips and pelvis are working well can keep the body strong and flexible, but it is also essential to rehabilitate these muscles to their optimum function following low back or pelvic injury.

Arthritis in the hips can also weaken the hip and pelvic muscles. Utilising RTUI to ensure you get the best out of your exercises can assist you to manage your arthritis by keeping strong and flexible.

Muscles that we image around the hip and pelvis are:

  • Iliopsoas (hip flexor)
  • Gluteus medius and minimus (essential for good one leg standing, walking and running)
  • Quadratus femoris (control of the hip in squatting)

Some interesting statistics that have been published concerning low back pain:

  • 80% of people aged between 20 and 50 will experience an episode of low back pain,
  • 80% of these will recover after approximately 6 weeks while 20% will go on to develop chronic low back pain,
  • 80% of those who recover within 6 weeks will experience another episode of low back pain within 12 months,
  • after the second episode of pain, that person is more likely to experience more frequent and more severe exacerbations of pain with time,
  • research has demonstrated that correct and effective retraining of the deep stabilising muscles following an episode of low back pain, compared to patients rehabilitated with standard exercise programmes, decreases the chance of recurrence of low back pain within a 2 year period by more than 13 times.
Pelvic floor

Using RTUI to assess and manage pelvic floor dysfunctions is invaluable. This method of assessment is non invasive with the probe being positioned across the lower belly. Bladder volume can be measured, and the client can watch their pelvic floor lift and fall as they contract and relax the muscles. Research has shown that 40% of people with pelvic floor dysfunction push their muscles down rather than lift the muscles upwards. Repeating the incorrect contraction can lead to further pelvic floor problems so it is important to practice the correct pattern of contraction from the beginning.

Stabilising muscle function for recovery from neck and back injury (incl. Whiplash)

The stabilising muscles of the lumbar spine are very deep and are difficult to assess accurately. It is also difficult to learn how to exercise the muscles correctly. Real-time ultrasound imaging produces an image of the stabilising muscles on a screen and allows the physiotherapist and the patient to watch the muscles work while they are being exercised. This allows accurate and measurable assessment of the muscles and helps the patients learn how to exercise the stabilising muscles correctly.

This Clinic offers real-time ultrasound imaging of the deep stabilising muscles of the lower back to assist with the assessment and rehabilitation of these muscles following an episode of low back pain. The Clinic sends a report outlining the real-time ultrasound imaging assessment findings to the doctor and the treating physiotherapist so the exercises can be progressed appropriately and precisely to suit the condition.

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Pre-operative Exercise Programs

You have been examined by the specialist and you have been told you need orthopaedic surgery. What should you do now? Getting yourself as strong, flexible and functional as you can BEFORE you have surgery will ensure you have the best post operative result possible. Whether you are booked in for spinal surgery, arthroscopic joint surgery, or a joint replacement, a pre-operative exercise program tailored to your needs can get your body ready for the surgery and the post operative rehabilitation. 

Move Well Physiotherapists can design a pre-operative program specific to your upcoming surgical procedure. The program may include:

  • Learning how to use crutches safely and up and down stairs
  • Strengthening muscles around the area being operated upon to get them in as good shape as possible before the surgery
  • Exercising your body generally so you are strong and flexible and ready for post operative rehabilitation
  • Balance exercises to ensure you are safe to move around
  • Strengthening your arms if you will be on crutches for a while
  • Breathing exercises
  • Hydrotherapy exercises
  • Teach you immediate post operative exercises that you can commence in hospital

If you are booked in for a musculo-skeletal surgical procedure, contact your nearest Move Well clinic and get yourself ready for rehab.

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Hydrotherapy

Hydrotherapy (water therapy) combines the benefits of a non weight bearing environment with the healing and relaxing properties of warm water. There are very few musculo-skeletal conditions that would not benefit from exercising in warm water. The buoyancy of the water allows you to perform movements and exercises that may be too difficult for you to perform on land. Painful joints are able to move through an increased range and weak muscles can be used more efficiently. Floats and bands can be used effectively to increase resistance and improve muscle strength.

Balance exercises can be performed with no risk of falling. Cardiovascular fitness can be improved. If you are partial or non weight bearing using crutches on land, exercising in water may allow you to start putting weight through your leg without pain or fear of falling.

Conditions suitable for hydrotherapy include:

  • Back and neck pain
  • Shoulder pain and stiffness
  • Post op orthopaedic surgery
  • Post op joint replacement (hip, knee, shoulder)
  • Post op spinal surgery
  • Sporting injuries rehabilitation
  • Arthritis
  • General strengthening, flexibility, fitness and balance retraining

All Move Well clinics offer hydrotherapy services in a heated pool supervised by a physiotherapist experienced in exercise prescription in water. You will be assessed in a Move Well clinic by a physiotherapist prior to referral to a Move Well hydrotherapy session and a program will be tailored to your individual needs.

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Dry Needling

Move Well Physiotherapists are trained in dry needling techniques that can be used to complement your physiotherapy treatment. Dry needling is the insertion of filament (acupuncture) needles into the soft tissues of the body to treat musculo-skeletal pain and dysfunction. The term “dry needling” refers to the use of acupuncture needles within western medicine practices, which is different to “acupuncture” which is based on oriental medical practices.

Trigger point dry needling

Dry needling can involve the needling of myofascial trigger points using acupuncture needles to deactivate the muscle spasm. With this method, the acupuncture needle is inserted directly into the trigger point and may be manipulated to assist with decreasing muscle spasm. These techniques are usually applied close to the area of pain.

Dry needling plus

Another form of dry needling, Dry Needling Plus (dnp), involves needling specific tissues identified by means of skilled assessment of range and palpation of tissues. With dnp techniques, acupuncture needles may be inserted into the deep connective tissues but also applied lightly down an entire limb. Often the needles may be inserted widely, sometimes quite a distance from the area of pain. dnp is highly effective in treating musculo-skeletal pain, neural restriction, and can also significantly assist people with chronic wide spread pain. Some clients report improved sleep patterns following wide application of dnp techniques.

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Stabilising Muscle Function

The Stabilising Muscles

Throughout the body there are strength muscles and stabilising muscles. The strength muscles produce the movement of the body while the stabilising muscles support and protect the body. The stabilising muscles are essential for the protection of the joints and other tissues by providing “shock-absorption” so that movement does not jerk or jolt the body. The stabilising muscles also maintain a static contraction to provide continuous support during prolonged postures (eg. sitting at a desk or standing for a long time) and to absorb minor jarring (eg driving in a car).

Generally, the strength muscles are large powerful muscles that can produce tremendous power. The strength muscles are usually developed by performing strong exercises (eg sit-ups or gym exercises). Some of the most commonly known strength muscles are the biceps muscle of the arm and the quadriceps muscle of the thigh. The stabilising muscles however are much smaller deeper muscles that do not generate great force. The stabilising muscles can only be developed by very specific and often quite gentle exercises.

Without good stabilising muscle function, the physical stress from even gentle daily activities can cause damage. Ironically, the stronger the strength muscles, the more stress that the body must absorb and the more damage that can be caused. The stabilising muscles must therefore be developed in proportion with the strength muscles.

Research shows that the stabilising muscles almost always weaken following an injury and will not necessarily automatically or spontaneously re-strengthen. Your physiotherapist can assess the stabilising muscles and teach the specific exercises to re-develop them to ensure complete recovery from injury and reduce the chance of recurrence. 

The Lumbar Spine

Correct function of the stabilising muscles of the lumbar spine is essential to maintain good spinal health. Following an injury to the lumbar spine or an episode of low back pain, the stabilising muscles often weaken and become unable to support and protect the spine. This lack of support and protection causes ongoing pain, slower recovery and increases the chance of re-injury.

Correct function of the stabilising muscles of the lumbar spine is essential to maintain good spinal health. Following an injury to the lumbar spine or an episode of low back pain, the stabilising muscles often weaken and become unable to support and protect the spine. This lack of support and protection causes ongoing pain, slower recovery and increases the chance of re-injury.

Recent physiotherapy research has shown that the stabilising muscles for the lower back (“Multifidus” and “Transversus Abdominis”) do not spontaneously re-develop following an injury and require very specific exercises to be re-strengthened. Sit-ups, back arches and similar exercises do not strengthen the stabilising muscles and in fact often cause more harm by developing the “wrong” muscles or stressing the injured tissues.

Stabilising muscle function should re-developed soon after the injury to prevent ongoing pain. Your physiotherapist will assess the stabilising muscles and will implement specific exercises as part of the treatment usually required for a full recovery from low back pain. 

Ultrasound Imaging

The stabilising muscles of the lumbar spine are very deep and are difficult to assess accurately. It is also difficult to learn how to exercise the muscles correctly. Real-time ultrasound imaging produces an image of the stabilising muscles on a screen and allows the physiotherapist and the patient to watch the muscles work while they are being exercised. This allows accurate and measurable assessment of the muscles and helps the patients learn how to exercise the stabilising muscles correctly.

This Clinic offers real-time ultrasound imaging of the deep stabilising muscles of the lower back to assist with the assessment and rehabilitation of these muscles following an episode of low back pain. The Clinic sends a report outlining the real-time ultrasound imaging assessment findings to the doctor and the treating physiotherapist so the exercises can be progressed appropriately and precisely to suit the condition. 

The Neck

The stabilising muscles of the neck “hold” the neck in the correct position and are therefore essential for good posture and correct movement. The stabilising muscles of the neck are also protect the spine from “micro-trauma” as a result of jarring or jerky movement.

Ongoing physiotherapy research has demonstrated that the deep stabilising muscles of the neck may weaken over several months or even years due to poor posture (eg sitting incorrectly at a desk for long periods) or the muscles may weaken over a few days as a result of an injury (eg. a car accident or carrying a heavy school bag). Whether neck pain occurs gradually or as a result of an injury, re-developing the stabilising muscles of the neck is usually essential for a full recovery.

If you have neck pain or neck-related headaches, the stabilising muscles will be assessed by your physiotherapist in combination with a full examination of your neck and posture. Like the exercises for the stabilising muscles of the lower back, the exercises for the stabilising muscles of the neck are very gentle. Your physiotherapist can teach you how to do these exercises properly.

If you have a history of neck problems you should also consult your physiotherapist before commencing a new exercise programme to be certain that the stabilising muscles of your neck are strong enough to support your head before you start lifting weights, swimming or jogging. The postural muscles of your back may also need to be strengthened to maintain good posture while you sit, stand and walk.

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Move Well Rehabilitation

Move Well Physiotherapists can devise a rehabilitation program tailored to your individual needs. We aim to get you pain free, mobile, strong, flexible, and ready to return to sport, work and life, as soon as possible.

Move Well Rehabilitation programs can include a combination of hands-on physiotherapy, real-time ultrasound imaging retraining of deep muscle function, supervised exercises within the clinic, supervised exercises within a gym local to the clinic, hydrotherapy sessions, one-on-one Pilates, and home based exercises.

Have you twisted your ankle or knee on the sporting field?

Research shows that it can take up to 12 months for your ankle and knee to regain full proprioception (balance and coordination) following a moderately severe ligament sprain.With physiotherapy treatment you may feel ready to return to sport after only a few weeks, but what are the chances you will re-injure the same ankle or knee?

Your Move Well Physiotherapist can develop a graduated rehabilitation program to retrain your proprioception, balance, strength and flexibility, to decrease the chance of you suffering the same injury a second time.

Are you recovering from orthopaedic or neurosurgery?

Whether you have had spinal, shoulder, elbow, wrist, hip, knee or ankle surgery, a graduated rehabilitation program will ensure you get the best possible outcome following your investment in surgery. Following surgery you will need to strengthen your muscles, mobilise your joints, and retrain ideal biomechanics to make sure you can move well, live well and stay well.

Have you injured your lower back around the house one too many times?

A Move Well Rehabilitation program, utilizing real-time ultrasound imaging to assess and retrain the deep muscles of the lower back, can assist with prevention of recurrence of your low back pain. You will be taught how to move more efficiently to take pressure off your lower back, and an exercise program (Pilates, gym, pool and/or home based) will be commenced to improve strength, flexibility and function.

Workers’ Compensation injuries and injuries sustained in a motor vehicle accident can all benefit from a Move Well Rehabilitation program.

Your Move Well Physiotherapist will liase with your GP, other health professionals and your insurance company to devise a treatment plan that is suitable for your needs. These may include physical conditioning programs, return to work programs, and work site assessments. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy is combined with physical, proprioceptive and exercise based treatments to ensure a holistic approach to management.

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Manipulative & Sports Physiotherapy

Manipulative Physiotherapy

Manipulative physiotherapy refers to the use of high velocity thrust techniques in order to manipulate a restricted or stiff joint and restore the normal range of movement to that joint. There is often an associated ´popping´ or ´clicking´ noise with these techniques. Theoretically, any joint can be manipulated but with Move Well Physiotherapists manipulation is only used when necessary and when the patient is comfortable with having the technique performed.

It is worth noting that manipulation forms only one aspect of manual therapy and that Move Well physiotherapists undergo intense continuing education to ensure that all their manual therapy techniques are up-to-date and refined. All Move Well Physiotherapists attend regular group sessions to practice high velocity thrust techniques under the supervision of a Specialist Musculo-skeletal Physiotherapist.

Sports Physiotherapy

Move Well Physiotherapy currently employs several sports physiotherapists as well as several physiotherapists who are fully qualified exercise physiologists. Several of our clinics also support local and community sports clubs and many of our staff travel interstate and overseas with representative teams in a variety of sports.

Move Well Physiotherapy is proud to provide physiotherapy and rehabilitation services to West Perth Football Club and Arena Swim Club.

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